Six figure salaries

Six figure salaries

Six figure salaries

First published in Somerset

MORE than 2,000 council staff across the UK earn more than £100,000 a year, but the total number earning six figure salaries has dropped slightly since last year, according to a survey by the Taxpayers’ Alliance.

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11:03am Mon 18 Aug 14

cliverita says...

Dispute the fact that they EARN it, like a lot of high salaried persons, THEY GET IT.
Dispute the fact that they EARN it, like a lot of high salaried persons, THEY GET IT. cliverita
  • Score: 6

12:37pm Mon 18 Aug 14

topcataj says...

Perhaps the Taxpayers Alliance would like to share information about the salaries of their members....
Perhaps the Taxpayers Alliance would like to share information about the salaries of their members.... topcataj
  • Score: 0

7:55am Tue 19 Aug 14

MARTINI 129 says...

How do they actually earn it ? They dont do manual job's !
How do they actually earn it ? They dont do manual job's ! MARTINI 129
  • Score: 2

4:14am Wed 20 Aug 14

ladybird14 says...

THESES ARE THE PEN PUSHER THAT KNOW SH**T AND WILL WANT BIG PAYOUTS ...................S
HELIA WHEELER!!!!!!!!!!
THESES ARE THE PEN PUSHER THAT KNOW SH**T AND WILL WANT BIG PAYOUTS ...................S HELIA WHEELER!!!!!!!!!! ladybird14
  • Score: 1

4:17am Wed 20 Aug 14

ladybird14 says...

cliverita wrote:
Dispute the fact that they EARN it, like a lot of high salaried persons, THEY GET IT.
HOW DO THEY EARN IT !!??
[quote][p][bold]cliverita[/bold] wrote: Dispute the fact that they EARN it, like a lot of high salaried persons, THEY GET IT.[/p][/quote]HOW DO THEY EARN IT !!?? ladybird14
  • Score: -5

11:35am Wed 20 Aug 14

Blue Owl says...

The problem with these Civil Servants, is that the " Jobs" are within Pay grades, across the Whole Civil Service, in the UK.
Therefore, the whole work ethics of these overpaid Civil Servants
, ( Servants they certain taint are Not !! Is to jump upgrade within to higher pay scale levels each year, by jumping through internal hoops.
Thus awarding higher Grading and Pay Structures !!! With the additional Pensions that are the Goals of all !!!! They need to look at the real world outside of the Councils Workers regime, the rest of us have to endure shrinking Pensions, not protected like theirs.
All you hear about is how bad off they are, by their Union ' Unite', who's
Salaries would also be good to Know ???
David L Preece
Blue-Owl
The problem with these Civil Servants, is that the " Jobs" are within Pay grades, across the Whole Civil Service, in the UK. Therefore, the whole work ethics of these overpaid Civil Servants , ( Servants they certain taint are Not !! Is to jump upgrade within to higher pay scale levels each year, by jumping through internal hoops. Thus awarding higher Grading and Pay Structures !!! With the additional Pensions that are the Goals of all !!!! They need to look at the real world outside of the Councils Workers regime, the rest of us have to endure shrinking Pensions, not protected like theirs. All you hear about is how bad off they are, by their Union ' Unite', who's Salaries would also be good to Know ??? David L Preece Blue-Owl Blue Owl
  • Score: -4

1:36pm Wed 20 Aug 14

SocialistParty-SomersetBranch says...

Since it was launched six years ago the alliance has become arguably the most influential pressure group in the country, yet neither the people who run it, or the backers who pay for it, have come under a great deal of scrutiny.

Its critics ask whether it really is an alliance of ordinary taxpayers, as the name is clearly intended to suggest, and how close it is to the Tory party hierarchy which seems to have adopted some of its radical ideas.

Certainly not all is as it seems. The same group that speaks out against government waste on Newsnight and in the pages of newspapers also runs a campaign against radicalising schoolbooks published by the Palestinian Authority and has formed an alliance with a Slovakian rightwing group

The group's leadership is no less esoteric. Alongside a fund manager, a petroleum geologist and a former chief economist at Lehman Brothers on the board, the directors include a retired teacher who lives in France and does not pay British tax.

But none of that has stopped frontbench Conservatives and business leaders flocking to the TPA, and at the Tory conference policy after policy seemed to bear the TPA's stamp.

"The idea of tearing down the walls of big government as Cameron did in his speech on Thursday is something we have been talking about for years," said its chief executive, Matthew Elliott, yesterday. "The Tory party has moved onto our agenda."

George Osborne's public sector pay freeze was recommended by the TPA last month and Elliott, who describes himself as "a free-market libertarian", said he had been "banging on about" the idea that no public worker should earn more than the prime minister without the chancellor's approval long before Osborne announced it.

The rightwing media have fallen in love too and the TPA claims a higher profile in print than Friends of the Earth and the Confederation of British Industry. Framed front pages line Elliott's office near the House of Commons as evidence of its success at creating the climate of opinion in which radical cuts to tax and spending can be made.

In the last year the Daily Mail quoted the TPA in 517 articles. The Sun obliged 307 times, once bizarrely on page 3 when a topless Keeley parroted the TPA's line against energy taxes. The Guardian mentioned the group 29 times.

The TPA's proposals include scrapping the secondary school building programme, child benefit and Sure Start centres for the youngest children. The range of its work reflects how influential the group has become in a relatively short space of time, but also raises questions over how it manages to pay for what has become a £1m a year operation. The alliance refuses to publish details of its income or its benefactors.

But a Guardian investigation has established that a large part of its funds come from wealthy donors, many of whom are prominent supporters of the Conservative party. Sixty per cent of donations come from individuals or groups giving more than £5,000. The Midlands Industrial Council, which has donated £1.5m to the Conservatives since 2003, said it has given around £80,000 on behalf of 32 owners of private companies. Tony Gallagher, owner of Gallagher UK, a property company that gave the Conservatives £250,000 in 2007, is a member of the MIC, as is Christopher Kelly who owns the international haulage firm Keltruck, and Robert Edmiston who owns IM Group, a large car importer.

"The concern for our members is that vast amounts of public money are being spent and we don't get value for that money," said David Wall, secretary of the MIC. "Our members' tax money is being wasted … start making some noise and all of a sudden it is on the agenda of the political parties."

A spokesman for Sir Anthony Bamford, the JCB tycoon, whose family and company have donated more than £1m to the Conservatives, said he has helped fund the TPA, as has the construction magnate Malcolm McAlpine.

David Alberto, co-owner of serviced office company Avanta, has donated Elliott and his 14 staff a suite in Westminster worth £100,000 a year because he opposes the level of tax on businesses. Alberto has an offshore family trust but said 90% of his wealth is in the UK, where he pays tax.

Other businessmen named by the TPA as supporters include spread betting tycoon Stuart Wheeler who gave £5m to the Conservatives before he endorsed the UK Independance party; Sir Rocco Forte, the hotelier; and Sir John Craven, chairman of mining group Lonmin. Labour figures certainly believe that the alliance is close to the Tories. "This is an arms-length Tory front operation run by big powerful business interests who want to remove themselves from paying tax by poisoning the well of public debate around the issue," said Labour MP Jon Cruddas.

"They are hugely influential," added a senior Labour figure. "It says something about the state of our party that we are letting them continue unchecked. Many Labour MPs are very worried that they are likely to grow in stature as the election approaches."

Elliott flatly denied the TPA was "a Conservative front organisation", and added that Lord Ashcroft, the party's deputy chairman who is known to bankroll many Conservative candidates in marginal seats, is not a donor.

They do not appear to need him. Funding has soared from £67,457 in 2005 to more than £1m and the number of supporters has increased 60% this year as a result of the combined effect of the recession and the MPs' expenses scandal.

Conservative politicians have also gathered round. Every month the TPA runs an open meeting for members of right-leaning thinktanks and politicians. In the last year talks have been given by Eric Pickles, the Conservative party chairman, Liam Fox, the shadow defence secretary, and former shadow home secretary David Davis.

They are chaired by Stephan Shakespeare, the owner of ConservativeHome.com
, a political website. Its editor, Tim Montgomerie, has claimed: "The TPA is more likely to deliver Eurosceptic change than Ukip."

Tim Horton, research director of the left-leaning Fabian Society, who has investigated the TPA, claimed the group is "fundamental to the Conservatives' political strategy", which he said was to destroy public confidence in politicians' ability to deliver public services, thereby paving the way for cuts.

"There is something deeply dishonest about their campaigns on government waste," he said. "Their aim isn't to make public spending work better, but to slash it dramatically. Yet none of them will campaign on their true vision of society: fewer public services. At least Thatcher was honest about the deal: less 'public' means you go private."

Elliott insists the TPA has grassroots support. It has a database of 3,000 activists who have given money or time and 32,000 supporters who "tend to be middle-aged, probably Eurosceptic, and they tend to be right-leaning, but not party political", according to a source with knowledge of the group.

When TPA began in 2003 there was really no kind of alliance ‑ just Elliott, then a 25-year-old political researcher for Conservative MEP Timothy Kirkhope. As a politics student Elliott had been impressed by Republican grassroots campaigns to cut tax and spending he had seen in America – particularly the work of Grover Norquist who campaigned against Hillary Clinton's healthcare plans during Bill Clinton's presidency.

"Up until that point Britain didn't need a taxpayers' group because we had the Conservatives, but then they stopped talking about it and so I saw a niche," he said.

His idea was to influence politics "not as an inside job but to go by public opinion and the press".

That year his wife, Florence Heath, a petroleum geologist, joined as director with Andrew Allum, a management consultant who is now chairman.

In a strange choice, Heath's father, Alexander, was also appointed despite living in France and not paying any British tax.

The board now features no one who could be described as just an ordinary taxpayer. Members include Ruth Lea, the former chief economist at Lehman Brothers, Mike Denham, a former Treasury economist who worked on tax and spending under Margaret Thatcher, and Saul Haydon Rowe, partner at financial firm Devon Capital LLP.

Some of the group's fringe campaigns also seem to dilute the idea that this is an alliance of ordinary taxpayers. Its campaign against "hate education" in the Palestinian territories stemmed from Elliott's personal concern about incitement of hatred towards Jewish people in the Middle East, his pro-Israel stance and the perception that British taxpayers' money was being misused to subsidise the publication of incendiary schoolbooks there.

It is also about to launch "Big Brother Watch" led by David Cameron's former chief of staff, Alex Deane, to "fight injustice and to protect personal liberties".

Elliott believes the grassroots support of its main cause will grow.

"I want lots more members," he said. "I would like to get to a situation where we have as many members as the Liberal Democrats.

"Perhaps our time will come next year if there are public sector strikes . That will be a key recruiter. We contend that wages in the public sector are higher than for similar jobs in the private sector. On top of that public sector workers have final salary pensions, so if they strike there will be frustration among the general public."

Key funder the MIC said the TPA must be equally aggressive in its campaign against the waste of taxpayers' money, if it is to continue to finance the TPA.

"The last thing we would want is to be accused of funding a political party by the back door," said David Wall.

Elliott insists the TPA will challenge a Tory government just as vigorously.

"I intend to take on David Cameron on value for money as aggressively as I have Gordon Brown," he said. " we will take on the unions as well as the government."

Who's who: Alliance's backers



David Alberto, 41, the co-owner of Avanta, a serviced offices company with operations in London, India and the United Arab Emirates, has donated free serviced office space in Westminster worth an estimated £100,000 a year.

"My bugbear is taxes and the cost of the state and how it has grown," Alberto said. "It is wrong to be spending a greater and greater proportion of GDP on central government. Stamp duty and capital gains tax have restricted our ability to expand."He said he keeps money in a family trust offshore, but the bulk of his wealth is held in his UK-registered companies.


Malcolm McAlpine, 92, a director of Sir Robert McAlpine, the construction firm building London's Olympic stadium, has given an undisclosed amount to the TPA. "Our family business … advocates value for money government and we, for some years, supported the Taxpayers Alliance, which brings to general attention a large number of instances of apparent excessive and unproductive expenditure of public funds," he said.

The TPA has criticised the Olympics project, which is funded with £9.3bn in public money.

"The fact that one supports an institution does not mean that one agrees or disagrees with every detail of their policies," said McAlpine.


Anthony Bamford, 63, a director of Staffordshire-based JC Bamford, which manufactures JCB diggers, has made minor donations in a private capacity, his spokesman said.

Bamford has also donated large sums of money to the Conservative party.

Source: The Guardian, Friday 9 October 2009 23.18 BST
Since it was launched six [now eleven] years ago the alliance has become arguably the most influential pressure group in the country, yet neither the people who run it, or the backers who pay for it, have come under a great deal of scrutiny. Its critics ask whether it really is an alliance of ordinary taxpayers, as the name is clearly intended to suggest, and how close it is to the Tory party hierarchy which seems to have adopted some of its radical ideas. Certainly not all is as it seems. The same group that speaks out against government waste on Newsnight and in the pages of newspapers also runs a campaign against radicalising schoolbooks published by the Palestinian Authority and has formed an alliance with a Slovakian rightwing group The group's leadership is no less esoteric. Alongside a fund manager, a petroleum geologist and a former chief economist at Lehman Brothers on the board, the directors include a retired teacher who lives in France and does not pay British tax. But none of that has stopped frontbench Conservatives and business leaders flocking to the TPA, and at the Tory conference policy after policy seemed to bear the TPA's stamp. "The idea of tearing down the walls of big government as Cameron did in his speech on Thursday is something we have been talking about for years," said its chief executive, Matthew Elliott, yesterday. "The Tory party has moved onto our agenda." George Osborne's public sector pay freeze was recommended by the TPA last month and Elliott, who describes himself as "a free-market libertarian", said he had been "banging on about" the idea that no public worker should earn more than the prime minister without the chancellor's approval long before Osborne announced it. The rightwing media have fallen in love too and the TPA claims a higher profile in print than Friends of the Earth and the Confederation of British Industry. Framed front pages line Elliott's office near the House of Commons as evidence of its success at creating the climate of opinion in which radical cuts to tax and spending can be made. In the last year the Daily Mail quoted the TPA in 517 articles. The Sun obliged 307 times, once bizarrely on page 3 when a topless Keeley parroted the TPA's line against energy taxes. The Guardian mentioned the group 29 times. The TPA's proposals include scrapping the secondary school building programme, child benefit and Sure Start centres for the youngest children. The range of its work reflects how influential the group has become in a relatively short space of time, but also raises questions over how it manages to pay for what has become a £1m a year operation. The alliance refuses to publish details of its income or its benefactors. But a Guardian investigation has established that a large part of its funds come from wealthy donors, many of whom are prominent supporters of the Conservative party. Sixty per cent of donations come from individuals or groups giving more than £5,000. The Midlands Industrial Council, which has donated £1.5m to the Conservatives since 2003, said it has given around £80,000 on behalf of 32 owners of private companies. Tony Gallagher, owner of Gallagher UK, a property company that gave the Conservatives £250,000 in 2007, is a member of the MIC, as is Christopher Kelly who owns the international haulage firm Keltruck, and Robert Edmiston who owns IM Group, a large car importer. "The concern for our members is that vast amounts of public money are being spent and we don't get value for that money," said David Wall, secretary of the MIC. "Our members' tax money is being wasted … [the TPA] start making some noise and all of a sudden it is on the agenda of the political parties." A spokesman for Sir Anthony Bamford, the JCB tycoon, whose family and company have donated more than £1m to the Conservatives, said he has helped fund the TPA, as has the construction magnate Malcolm McAlpine. David Alberto, co-owner of serviced office company Avanta, has donated Elliott and his 14 staff a suite in Westminster worth £100,000 a year because he opposes the level of tax on businesses. Alberto has an offshore family trust but said 90% of his wealth is in the UK, where he pays tax. Other businessmen named by the TPA as supporters include spread betting tycoon Stuart Wheeler who gave £5m to the Conservatives before he endorsed the UK Independance party; Sir Rocco Forte, the hotelier; and Sir John Craven, chairman of mining group Lonmin. Labour figures certainly believe that the alliance is close to the Tories. "This is an arms-length Tory front operation run by big powerful business interests who want to remove themselves from paying tax by poisoning the well of public debate around the issue," said Labour MP Jon Cruddas. "They are hugely influential," added a senior Labour figure. "It says something about the state of our party that we are letting them continue unchecked. Many Labour MPs are very worried that they are likely to grow in stature as the election approaches." Elliott flatly denied the TPA was "a Conservative front organisation", and added that Lord Ashcroft, the party's deputy chairman who is known to bankroll many Conservative candidates in marginal seats, is not a donor. They do not appear to need him. Funding has soared from £67,457 in 2005 to more than £1m and the number of supporters has increased 60% this year as a result of the combined effect of the recession and the MPs' expenses scandal. Conservative politicians have also gathered round. Every month the TPA runs an open meeting for members of right-leaning thinktanks and politicians. In the last year talks have been given by Eric Pickles, the Conservative party chairman, Liam Fox, the shadow defence secretary, and former shadow home secretary David Davis. They are chaired by Stephan Shakespeare, the owner of ConservativeHome.com , a political website. Its editor, Tim Montgomerie, has claimed: "The TPA is more likely to deliver Eurosceptic change than Ukip." Tim Horton, research director of the left-leaning Fabian Society, who has investigated the TPA, claimed the group is "fundamental to the Conservatives' political strategy", which he said was to destroy public confidence in politicians' ability to deliver public services, thereby paving the way for cuts. "There is something deeply dishonest about their campaigns on government waste," he said. "Their aim isn't to make public spending work better, but to slash it dramatically. Yet none of them will campaign on their true vision of society: fewer public services. At least Thatcher was honest about the deal: less 'public' means you go private." Elliott insists the TPA has grassroots support. It has a database of 3,000 activists who have given money or time and 32,000 supporters who "tend to be middle-aged, probably Eurosceptic, and they tend to be right-leaning, but not party political", according to a source with knowledge of the group. When TPA began in 2003 there was really no kind of alliance ‑ just Elliott, then a 25-year-old political researcher for Conservative MEP Timothy Kirkhope. As a politics student Elliott had been impressed by Republican grassroots campaigns to cut tax and spending he had seen in America – particularly the work of Grover Norquist who campaigned against Hillary Clinton's healthcare plans during Bill Clinton's presidency. "Up until that point Britain didn't need a taxpayers' group because we had the Conservatives, but then they stopped talking about it and so I saw a niche," he said. His idea was to influence politics "not as an inside job [lobbying politicians] but to go by public opinion and the press". That year his wife, Florence Heath, a petroleum geologist, joined as director with Andrew Allum, a management consultant who is now chairman. In a strange choice, Heath's father, Alexander, was also appointed despite living in France and not paying any British tax. The board now features no one who could be described as just an ordinary taxpayer. Members include Ruth Lea, the former chief economist at Lehman Brothers, Mike Denham, a former Treasury economist who worked on tax and spending under Margaret Thatcher, and Saul Haydon Rowe, partner at financial firm Devon Capital LLP. Some of the group's fringe campaigns also seem to dilute the idea that this is an alliance of ordinary taxpayers. Its campaign against "hate education" in the Palestinian territories stemmed from Elliott's personal concern about incitement of hatred towards Jewish people in the Middle East, his pro-Israel stance and the perception that British taxpayers' money was being misused to subsidise the publication of incendiary schoolbooks there. It is also about to launch "Big Brother Watch" led by David Cameron's former chief of staff, Alex Deane, to "fight injustice and to protect personal liberties". Elliott believes the grassroots support of its main cause will grow. "I want lots more members," he said. "I would like to get to a situation where we have as many members as the Liberal Democrats. "Perhaps our time will come next year if there are public sector strikes [over the proposed Tory cuts]. That will be a key recruiter. We contend that wages in the public sector are higher than for similar jobs in the private sector. On top of that public sector workers have final salary pensions, so if they strike there will be frustration among the general public." Key funder the MIC said the TPA must be equally aggressive in its campaign against the waste of taxpayers' money, if it is to continue to finance the TPA. "The last thing we would want is to be accused of funding a political party by the back door," said David Wall. Elliott insists the TPA will challenge a Tory government just as vigorously. "I intend to take on David Cameron on value for money as aggressively as I have Gordon Brown," he said. "[If there are strikes] we will take on the unions as well as the government." Who's who: Alliance's backers David Alberto, 41, the co-owner of Avanta, a serviced offices company with operations in London, India and the United Arab Emirates, has donated free serviced office space in Westminster worth an estimated £100,000 a year. "My bugbear is taxes and the cost of the state and how it has grown," Alberto said. "It is wrong to be spending a greater and greater proportion of GDP on central government. Stamp duty and capital gains tax have restricted our ability to expand."He said he keeps money in a family trust offshore, but the bulk of his wealth is held in his UK-registered companies. Malcolm McAlpine, 92, a director of Sir Robert McAlpine, the construction firm building London's Olympic stadium, has given an undisclosed amount to the TPA. "Our family business … advocates value for money government and we, for some years, supported the Taxpayers Alliance, which brings to general attention a large number of instances of apparent excessive and unproductive expenditure of public funds," he said. The TPA has criticised the Olympics project, which is funded with £9.3bn in public money. "The fact that one supports an institution does not mean that one agrees or disagrees with every detail of their policies," said McAlpine. Anthony Bamford, 63, a director of Staffordshire-based JC Bamford, which manufactures JCB diggers, has made minor donations in a private capacity, his spokesman said. Bamford has also donated large sums of money to the Conservative party. Source: The Guardian, Friday 9 October 2009 23.18 BST SocialistParty-SomersetBranch
  • Score: -8

1:36pm Wed 20 Aug 14

SocialistParty-SomersetBranch says...

Since it was launched six years ago the alliance has become arguably the most influential pressure group in the country, yet neither the people who run it, or the backers who pay for it, have come under a great deal of scrutiny.

Its critics ask whether it really is an alliance of ordinary taxpayers, as the name is clearly intended to suggest, and how close it is to the Tory party hierarchy which seems to have adopted some of its radical ideas.

Certainly not all is as it seems. The same group that speaks out against government waste on Newsnight and in the pages of newspapers also runs a campaign against radicalising schoolbooks published by the Palestinian Authority and has formed an alliance with a Slovakian rightwing group

The group's leadership is no less esoteric. Alongside a fund manager, a petroleum geologist and a former chief economist at Lehman Brothers on the board, the directors include a retired teacher who lives in France and does not pay British tax.

But none of that has stopped frontbench Conservatives and business leaders flocking to the TPA, and at the Tory conference policy after policy seemed to bear the TPA's stamp.

"The idea of tearing down the walls of big government as Cameron did in his speech on Thursday is something we have been talking about for years," said its chief executive, Matthew Elliott, yesterday. "The Tory party has moved onto our agenda."

George Osborne's public sector pay freeze was recommended by the TPA last month and Elliott, who describes himself as "a free-market libertarian", said he had been "banging on about" the idea that no public worker should earn more than the prime minister without the chancellor's approval long before Osborne announced it.

The rightwing media have fallen in love too and the TPA claims a higher profile in print than Friends of the Earth and the Confederation of British Industry. Framed front pages line Elliott's office near the House of Commons as evidence of its success at creating the climate of opinion in which radical cuts to tax and spending can be made.

In the last year the Daily Mail quoted the TPA in 517 articles. The Sun obliged 307 times, once bizarrely on page 3 when a topless Keeley parroted the TPA's line against energy taxes. The Guardian mentioned the group 29 times.

The TPA's proposals include scrapping the secondary school building programme, child benefit and Sure Start centres for the youngest children. The range of its work reflects how influential the group has become in a relatively short space of time, but also raises questions over how it manages to pay for what has become a £1m a year operation. The alliance refuses to publish details of its income or its benefactors.

But a Guardian investigation has established that a large part of its funds come from wealthy donors, many of whom are prominent supporters of the Conservative party. Sixty per cent of donations come from individuals or groups giving more than £5,000. The Midlands Industrial Council, which has donated £1.5m to the Conservatives since 2003, said it has given around £80,000 on behalf of 32 owners of private companies. Tony Gallagher, owner of Gallagher UK, a property company that gave the Conservatives £250,000 in 2007, is a member of the MIC, as is Christopher Kelly who owns the international haulage firm Keltruck, and Robert Edmiston who owns IM Group, a large car importer.

"The concern for our members is that vast amounts of public money are being spent and we don't get value for that money," said David Wall, secretary of the MIC. "Our members' tax money is being wasted … start making some noise and all of a sudden it is on the agenda of the political parties."

A spokesman for Sir Anthony Bamford, the JCB tycoon, whose family and company have donated more than £1m to the Conservatives, said he has helped fund the TPA, as has the construction magnate Malcolm McAlpine.

David Alberto, co-owner of serviced office company Avanta, has donated Elliott and his 14 staff a suite in Westminster worth £100,000 a year because he opposes the level of tax on businesses. Alberto has an offshore family trust but said 90% of his wealth is in the UK, where he pays tax.

Other businessmen named by the TPA as supporters include spread betting tycoon Stuart Wheeler who gave £5m to the Conservatives before he endorsed the UK Independance party; Sir Rocco Forte, the hotelier; and Sir John Craven, chairman of mining group Lonmin. Labour figures certainly believe that the alliance is close to the Tories. "This is an arms-length Tory front operation run by big powerful business interests who want to remove themselves from paying tax by poisoning the well of public debate around the issue," said Labour MP Jon Cruddas.

"They are hugely influential," added a senior Labour figure. "It says something about the state of our party that we are letting them continue unchecked. Many Labour MPs are very worried that they are likely to grow in stature as the election approaches."

Elliott flatly denied the TPA was "a Conservative front organisation", and added that Lord Ashcroft, the party's deputy chairman who is known to bankroll many Conservative candidates in marginal seats, is not a donor.

They do not appear to need him. Funding has soared from £67,457 in 2005 to more than £1m and the number of supporters has increased 60% this year as a result of the combined effect of the recession and the MPs' expenses scandal.

Conservative politicians have also gathered round. Every month the TPA runs an open meeting for members of right-leaning thinktanks and politicians. In the last year talks have been given by Eric Pickles, the Conservative party chairman, Liam Fox, the shadow defence secretary, and former shadow home secretary David Davis.

They are chaired by Stephan Shakespeare, the owner of ConservativeHome.com
, a political website. Its editor, Tim Montgomerie, has claimed: "The TPA is more likely to deliver Eurosceptic change than Ukip."

Tim Horton, research director of the left-leaning Fabian Society, who has investigated the TPA, claimed the group is "fundamental to the Conservatives' political strategy", which he said was to destroy public confidence in politicians' ability to deliver public services, thereby paving the way for cuts.

"There is something deeply dishonest about their campaigns on government waste," he said. "Their aim isn't to make public spending work better, but to slash it dramatically. Yet none of them will campaign on their true vision of society: fewer public services. At least Thatcher was honest about the deal: less 'public' means you go private."

Elliott insists the TPA has grassroots support. It has a database of 3,000 activists who have given money or time and 32,000 supporters who "tend to be middle-aged, probably Eurosceptic, and they tend to be right-leaning, but not party political", according to a source with knowledge of the group.

When TPA began in 2003 there was really no kind of alliance ‑ just Elliott, then a 25-year-old political researcher for Conservative MEP Timothy Kirkhope. As a politics student Elliott had been impressed by Republican grassroots campaigns to cut tax and spending he had seen in America – particularly the work of Grover Norquist who campaigned against Hillary Clinton's healthcare plans during Bill Clinton's presidency.

"Up until that point Britain didn't need a taxpayers' group because we had the Conservatives, but then they stopped talking about it and so I saw a niche," he said.

His idea was to influence politics "not as an inside job but to go by public opinion and the press".

That year his wife, Florence Heath, a petroleum geologist, joined as director with Andrew Allum, a management consultant who is now chairman.

In a strange choice, Heath's father, Alexander, was also appointed despite living in France and not paying any British tax.

The board now features no one who could be described as just an ordinary taxpayer. Members include Ruth Lea, the former chief economist at Lehman Brothers, Mike Denham, a former Treasury economist who worked on tax and spending under Margaret Thatcher, and Saul Haydon Rowe, partner at financial firm Devon Capital LLP.

Some of the group's fringe campaigns also seem to dilute the idea that this is an alliance of ordinary taxpayers. Its campaign against "hate education" in the Palestinian territories stemmed from Elliott's personal concern about incitement of hatred towards Jewish people in the Middle East, his pro-Israel stance and the perception that British taxpayers' money was being misused to subsidise the publication of incendiary schoolbooks there.

It is also about to launch "Big Brother Watch" led by David Cameron's former chief of staff, Alex Deane, to "fight injustice and to protect personal liberties".

Elliott believes the grassroots support of its main cause will grow.

"I want lots more members," he said. "I would like to get to a situation where we have as many members as the Liberal Democrats.

"Perhaps our time will come next year if there are public sector strikes . That will be a key recruiter. We contend that wages in the public sector are higher than for similar jobs in the private sector. On top of that public sector workers have final salary pensions, so if they strike there will be frustration among the general public."

Key funder the MIC said the TPA must be equally aggressive in its campaign against the waste of taxpayers' money, if it is to continue to finance the TPA.

"The last thing we would want is to be accused of funding a political party by the back door," said David Wall.

Elliott insists the TPA will challenge a Tory government just as vigorously.

"I intend to take on David Cameron on value for money as aggressively as I have Gordon Brown," he said. " we will take on the unions as well as the government."

Who's who: Alliance's backers



David Alberto, 41, the co-owner of Avanta, a serviced offices company with operations in London, India and the United Arab Emirates, has donated free serviced office space in Westminster worth an estimated £100,000 a year.

"My bugbear is taxes and the cost of the state and how it has grown," Alberto said. "It is wrong to be spending a greater and greater proportion of GDP on central government. Stamp duty and capital gains tax have restricted our ability to expand."He said he keeps money in a family trust offshore, but the bulk of his wealth is held in his UK-registered companies.


Malcolm McAlpine, 92, a director of Sir Robert McAlpine, the construction firm building London's Olympic stadium, has given an undisclosed amount to the TPA. "Our family business … advocates value for money government and we, for some years, supported the Taxpayers Alliance, which brings to general attention a large number of instances of apparent excessive and unproductive expenditure of public funds," he said.

The TPA has criticised the Olympics project, which is funded with £9.3bn in public money.

"The fact that one supports an institution does not mean that one agrees or disagrees with every detail of their policies," said McAlpine.


Anthony Bamford, 63, a director of Staffordshire-based JC Bamford, which manufactures JCB diggers, has made minor donations in a private capacity, his spokesman said.

Bamford has also donated large sums of money to the Conservative party.

Source: The Guardian, Friday 9 October 2009 23.18 BST
Since it was launched six [now eleven] years ago the alliance has become arguably the most influential pressure group in the country, yet neither the people who run it, or the backers who pay for it, have come under a great deal of scrutiny. Its critics ask whether it really is an alliance of ordinary taxpayers, as the name is clearly intended to suggest, and how close it is to the Tory party hierarchy which seems to have adopted some of its radical ideas. Certainly not all is as it seems. The same group that speaks out against government waste on Newsnight and in the pages of newspapers also runs a campaign against radicalising schoolbooks published by the Palestinian Authority and has formed an alliance with a Slovakian rightwing group The group's leadership is no less esoteric. Alongside a fund manager, a petroleum geologist and a former chief economist at Lehman Brothers on the board, the directors include a retired teacher who lives in France and does not pay British tax. But none of that has stopped frontbench Conservatives and business leaders flocking to the TPA, and at the Tory conference policy after policy seemed to bear the TPA's stamp. "The idea of tearing down the walls of big government as Cameron did in his speech on Thursday is something we have been talking about for years," said its chief executive, Matthew Elliott, yesterday. "The Tory party has moved onto our agenda." George Osborne's public sector pay freeze was recommended by the TPA last month and Elliott, who describes himself as "a free-market libertarian", said he had been "banging on about" the idea that no public worker should earn more than the prime minister without the chancellor's approval long before Osborne announced it. The rightwing media have fallen in love too and the TPA claims a higher profile in print than Friends of the Earth and the Confederation of British Industry. Framed front pages line Elliott's office near the House of Commons as evidence of its success at creating the climate of opinion in which radical cuts to tax and spending can be made. In the last year the Daily Mail quoted the TPA in 517 articles. The Sun obliged 307 times, once bizarrely on page 3 when a topless Keeley parroted the TPA's line against energy taxes. The Guardian mentioned the group 29 times. The TPA's proposals include scrapping the secondary school building programme, child benefit and Sure Start centres for the youngest children. The range of its work reflects how influential the group has become in a relatively short space of time, but also raises questions over how it manages to pay for what has become a £1m a year operation. The alliance refuses to publish details of its income or its benefactors. But a Guardian investigation has established that a large part of its funds come from wealthy donors, many of whom are prominent supporters of the Conservative party. Sixty per cent of donations come from individuals or groups giving more than £5,000. The Midlands Industrial Council, which has donated £1.5m to the Conservatives since 2003, said it has given around £80,000 on behalf of 32 owners of private companies. Tony Gallagher, owner of Gallagher UK, a property company that gave the Conservatives £250,000 in 2007, is a member of the MIC, as is Christopher Kelly who owns the international haulage firm Keltruck, and Robert Edmiston who owns IM Group, a large car importer. "The concern for our members is that vast amounts of public money are being spent and we don't get value for that money," said David Wall, secretary of the MIC. "Our members' tax money is being wasted … [the TPA] start making some noise and all of a sudden it is on the agenda of the political parties." A spokesman for Sir Anthony Bamford, the JCB tycoon, whose family and company have donated more than £1m to the Conservatives, said he has helped fund the TPA, as has the construction magnate Malcolm McAlpine. David Alberto, co-owner of serviced office company Avanta, has donated Elliott and his 14 staff a suite in Westminster worth £100,000 a year because he opposes the level of tax on businesses. Alberto has an offshore family trust but said 90% of his wealth is in the UK, where he pays tax. Other businessmen named by the TPA as supporters include spread betting tycoon Stuart Wheeler who gave £5m to the Conservatives before he endorsed the UK Independance party; Sir Rocco Forte, the hotelier; and Sir John Craven, chairman of mining group Lonmin. Labour figures certainly believe that the alliance is close to the Tories. "This is an arms-length Tory front operation run by big powerful business interests who want to remove themselves from paying tax by poisoning the well of public debate around the issue," said Labour MP Jon Cruddas. "They are hugely influential," added a senior Labour figure. "It says something about the state of our party that we are letting them continue unchecked. Many Labour MPs are very worried that they are likely to grow in stature as the election approaches." Elliott flatly denied the TPA was "a Conservative front organisation", and added that Lord Ashcroft, the party's deputy chairman who is known to bankroll many Conservative candidates in marginal seats, is not a donor. They do not appear to need him. Funding has soared from £67,457 in 2005 to more than £1m and the number of supporters has increased 60% this year as a result of the combined effect of the recession and the MPs' expenses scandal. Conservative politicians have also gathered round. Every month the TPA runs an open meeting for members of right-leaning thinktanks and politicians. In the last year talks have been given by Eric Pickles, the Conservative party chairman, Liam Fox, the shadow defence secretary, and former shadow home secretary David Davis. They are chaired by Stephan Shakespeare, the owner of ConservativeHome.com , a political website. Its editor, Tim Montgomerie, has claimed: "The TPA is more likely to deliver Eurosceptic change than Ukip." Tim Horton, research director of the left-leaning Fabian Society, who has investigated the TPA, claimed the group is "fundamental to the Conservatives' political strategy", which he said was to destroy public confidence in politicians' ability to deliver public services, thereby paving the way for cuts. "There is something deeply dishonest about their campaigns on government waste," he said. "Their aim isn't to make public spending work better, but to slash it dramatically. Yet none of them will campaign on their true vision of society: fewer public services. At least Thatcher was honest about the deal: less 'public' means you go private." Elliott insists the TPA has grassroots support. It has a database of 3,000 activists who have given money or time and 32,000 supporters who "tend to be middle-aged, probably Eurosceptic, and they tend to be right-leaning, but not party political", according to a source with knowledge of the group. When TPA began in 2003 there was really no kind of alliance ‑ just Elliott, then a 25-year-old political researcher for Conservative MEP Timothy Kirkhope. As a politics student Elliott had been impressed by Republican grassroots campaigns to cut tax and spending he had seen in America – particularly the work of Grover Norquist who campaigned against Hillary Clinton's healthcare plans during Bill Clinton's presidency. "Up until that point Britain didn't need a taxpayers' group because we had the Conservatives, but then they stopped talking about it and so I saw a niche," he said. His idea was to influence politics "not as an inside job [lobbying politicians] but to go by public opinion and the press". That year his wife, Florence Heath, a petroleum geologist, joined as director with Andrew Allum, a management consultant who is now chairman. In a strange choice, Heath's father, Alexander, was also appointed despite living in France and not paying any British tax. The board now features no one who could be described as just an ordinary taxpayer. Members include Ruth Lea, the former chief economist at Lehman Brothers, Mike Denham, a former Treasury economist who worked on tax and spending under Margaret Thatcher, and Saul Haydon Rowe, partner at financial firm Devon Capital LLP. Some of the group's fringe campaigns also seem to dilute the idea that this is an alliance of ordinary taxpayers. Its campaign against "hate education" in the Palestinian territories stemmed from Elliott's personal concern about incitement of hatred towards Jewish people in the Middle East, his pro-Israel stance and the perception that British taxpayers' money was being misused to subsidise the publication of incendiary schoolbooks there. It is also about to launch "Big Brother Watch" led by David Cameron's former chief of staff, Alex Deane, to "fight injustice and to protect personal liberties". Elliott believes the grassroots support of its main cause will grow. "I want lots more members," he said. "I would like to get to a situation where we have as many members as the Liberal Democrats. "Perhaps our time will come next year if there are public sector strikes [over the proposed Tory cuts]. That will be a key recruiter. We contend that wages in the public sector are higher than for similar jobs in the private sector. On top of that public sector workers have final salary pensions, so if they strike there will be frustration among the general public." Key funder the MIC said the TPA must be equally aggressive in its campaign against the waste of taxpayers' money, if it is to continue to finance the TPA. "The last thing we would want is to be accused of funding a political party by the back door," said David Wall. Elliott insists the TPA will challenge a Tory government just as vigorously. "I intend to take on David Cameron on value for money as aggressively as I have Gordon Brown," he said. "[If there are strikes] we will take on the unions as well as the government." Who's who: Alliance's backers David Alberto, 41, the co-owner of Avanta, a serviced offices company with operations in London, India and the United Arab Emirates, has donated free serviced office space in Westminster worth an estimated £100,000 a year. "My bugbear is taxes and the cost of the state and how it has grown," Alberto said. "It is wrong to be spending a greater and greater proportion of GDP on central government. Stamp duty and capital gains tax have restricted our ability to expand."He said he keeps money in a family trust offshore, but the bulk of his wealth is held in his UK-registered companies. Malcolm McAlpine, 92, a director of Sir Robert McAlpine, the construction firm building London's Olympic stadium, has given an undisclosed amount to the TPA. "Our family business … advocates value for money government and we, for some years, supported the Taxpayers Alliance, which brings to general attention a large number of instances of apparent excessive and unproductive expenditure of public funds," he said. The TPA has criticised the Olympics project, which is funded with £9.3bn in public money. "The fact that one supports an institution does not mean that one agrees or disagrees with every detail of their policies," said McAlpine. Anthony Bamford, 63, a director of Staffordshire-based JC Bamford, which manufactures JCB diggers, has made minor donations in a private capacity, his spokesman said. Bamford has also donated large sums of money to the Conservative party. Source: The Guardian, Friday 9 October 2009 23.18 BST SocialistParty-SomersetBranch
  • Score: -6

1:46pm Wed 20 Aug 14

SocialistParty-SomersetBranch says...

Francis Bacon, the 17th century philosopher, said that money was like muck - no good unless it is spread evenly. However, a report produced this month by the Equality Trust and Ipsos MORI shows that the rich and powerful of Britain would rather pollute all of society with their stinking midden than allow that to happen.

The report shows that there is a widespread misunderstanding about how the UK tax system overwhelmingly favours the rich.

It reveals that the poorest 10% pay 43% of their income in tax while the richest 10% get away with paying only 35%. So much for the 'we're all in it together' 'big society' of David Cameron, or the 'one nation' of Ed Miliband.

Those at the bottom also pay a greater proportion of indirect taxes such as VAT and pay four times more of their income in council tax than the top 10%.

Who's benefiting?

The report notes that for the majority real wages are continuing to fall, while the super-rich are seeing their wealth pile up. In the past year, the richest 100 people in the UK have seen their wealth increase by £40 billion to a record £297 billion. The report asks, if there is a recovery, who is benefiting?

Most striking of all is that the majority of people not only think the tax system is fairer than it really is - 68% of people believe that the top 10% already pay more, despite the reality - but that most would go much further. 82% believe that the top 10% should pay a greater amount of tax, and 96% say that the system should be more progressive. So there is clearly huge support for a tax system that favours ordinary people.

These figures leave out the £120 billion in avoided, evaded and uncollected taxes - which is a further indictment of the gaping chasm between rich and poor.

It completely shatters the lies of Tory Chancellor George Osborne and other ministers that the rich have 'paid their fair share', and especially that his recent changes have lifted more of the poorest workers out of taxation.

The 'tax free' threshold may have changed, but income tax is only a quarter of the taxes paid by people; the other 75% of indirect taxes are levied disproportionately on the poor and the working class.

The report concludes with the recommendation that all parties should commit to the principle that any future changes to taxation are progressive. Socialist Party members support this, as well as taxing the idle assets of big business piled up in bank vaults; but it is not enough.

The huge amount of avoided and evaded wealth shows that the capitalists would rather suffocate us all in manure than give up their profits.

Taxation is just one source of anger among many Tory austerity attacks, but unfair taxes sparked the English civil war in the century of Francis Bacon and a mass non-payment campaign overthrew Thatcher's hated poll tax.

The dung heap of capitalism is fertile compost for the growth of socialist ideas and for a more equal society fit for everyone.

For more information, or to join the Socialist Party, visit: www.socialistparty.o
rg.uk
Francis Bacon, the 17th century philosopher, said that money was like muck - no good unless it is spread evenly. However, a report produced this month by the Equality Trust and Ipsos MORI shows that the rich and powerful of Britain would rather pollute all of society with their stinking midden than allow that to happen. The report shows that there is a widespread misunderstanding about how the UK tax system overwhelmingly favours the rich. It reveals that the poorest 10% pay 43% of their income in tax while the richest 10% get away with paying only 35%. So much for the 'we're all in it together' 'big society' of David Cameron, or the 'one nation' of Ed Miliband. Those at the bottom also pay a greater proportion of indirect taxes such as VAT and pay four times more of their income in council tax than the top 10%. Who's benefiting? The report notes that for the majority real wages are continuing to fall, while the super-rich are seeing their wealth pile up. In the past year, the richest 100 people in the UK have seen their wealth increase by £40 billion to a record £297 billion. The report asks, if there is a recovery, who is benefiting? Most striking of all is that the majority of people not only think the tax system is fairer than it really is - 68% of people believe that the top 10% already pay more, despite the reality - but that most would go much further. 82% believe that the top 10% should pay a greater amount of tax, and 96% say that the system should be more progressive. So there is clearly huge support for a tax system that favours ordinary people. These figures leave out the £120 billion in avoided, evaded and uncollected taxes - which is a further indictment of the gaping chasm between rich and poor. It completely shatters the lies of Tory Chancellor George Osborne and other ministers that the rich have 'paid their fair share', and especially that his recent changes have lifted more of the poorest workers out of taxation. The 'tax free' threshold may have changed, but income tax is only a quarter of the taxes paid by people; the other 75% of indirect taxes are levied disproportionately on the poor and the working class. The report concludes with the recommendation that all parties should commit to the principle that any future changes to taxation are progressive. Socialist Party members support this, as well as taxing the idle assets of big business piled up in bank vaults; but it is not enough. The huge amount of avoided and evaded wealth shows that the capitalists would rather suffocate us all in manure than give up their profits. Taxation is just one source of anger among many Tory austerity attacks, but unfair taxes sparked the English civil war in the century of Francis Bacon and a mass non-payment campaign overthrew Thatcher's hated poll tax. The dung heap of capitalism is fertile compost for the growth of socialist ideas and for a more equal society fit for everyone. For more information, or to join the Socialist Party, visit: www.socialistparty.o rg.uk SocialistParty-SomersetBranch
  • Score: -7

4:40pm Wed 20 Aug 14

Conveyance says...

Worst thing is they sleep very well beacause they actually think that they deserve it!
Worst thing is they sleep very well beacause they actually think that they deserve it! Conveyance
  • Score: 6

4:41pm Wed 20 Aug 14

Conveyance says...

Conveyance wrote:
Worst thing is they sleep very well beacause they actually think that they deserve it!
Worst thing is they sleep very well because they actually believe that they deserve it!
[quote][p][bold]Conveyance[/bold] wrote: Worst thing is they sleep very well beacause they actually think that they deserve it![/p][/quote]Worst thing is they sleep very well because they actually believe that they deserve it! Conveyance
  • Score: -1

5:17pm Wed 20 Aug 14

heather147 says...

I know this is a silly question but how do people get to six figure salary jobs? There are never any advertised in the Gazette, just many on the minimum wage.
I know this is a silly question but how do people get to six figure salary jobs? There are never any advertised in the Gazette, just many on the minimum wage. heather147
  • Score: 2

5:21pm Wed 20 Aug 14

ladybird14 says...

Blue Owl wrote:
The problem with these Civil Servants, is that the " Jobs" are within Pay grades, across the Whole Civil Service, in the UK.
Therefore, the whole work ethics of these overpaid Civil Servants
, ( Servants they certain taint are Not !! Is to jump upgrade within to higher pay scale levels each year, by jumping through internal hoops.
Thus awarding higher Grading and Pay Structures !!! With the additional Pensions that are the Goals of all !!!! They need to look at the real world outside of the Councils Workers regime, the rest of us have to endure shrinking Pensions, not protected like theirs.
All you hear about is how bad off they are, by their Union ' Unite', who's
Salaries would also be good to Know ???
David L Preece
Blue-Owl
I have to say i totally agree with ,if only all this in house pay rises would stop and they had to live like the rest of us who do actually EARN our wages !!!
[quote][p][bold]Blue Owl[/bold] wrote: The problem with these Civil Servants, is that the " Jobs" are within Pay grades, across the Whole Civil Service, in the UK. Therefore, the whole work ethics of these overpaid Civil Servants , ( Servants they certain taint are Not !! Is to jump upgrade within to higher pay scale levels each year, by jumping through internal hoops. Thus awarding higher Grading and Pay Structures !!! With the additional Pensions that are the Goals of all !!!! They need to look at the real world outside of the Councils Workers regime, the rest of us have to endure shrinking Pensions, not protected like theirs. All you hear about is how bad off they are, by their Union ' Unite', who's Salaries would also be good to Know ??? David L Preece Blue-Owl[/p][/quote]I have to say i totally agree with ,if only all this in house pay rises would stop and they had to live like the rest of us who do actually EARN our wages !!! ladybird14
  • Score: -2

2:41pm Thu 21 Aug 14

SocialistParty-SomersetBranch says...

However...the billionaire-owned press (including the Gazette) are quite happy to regularly quote these senior officers in receipt of bloated salaries, when the same said officers are vocally opposing low-paid local government workers' strike action whilst also insisting (I e perpetuating the lie) that the provision of services will be unaffected!





Unite to fight pay robbery

*Lobby the TUC on 7 September
*Coordinate strikes on 14 October
*Join the TUC London demo on 18 October

www.socialistparty.o
rg.uk
However...the billionaire-owned press (including the Gazette) are quite happy to regularly quote these senior officers in receipt of bloated salaries, when the same said officers are vocally opposing low-paid local government workers' strike action whilst also insisting (I e perpetuating the lie) that the provision of services will be unaffected! Unite to fight pay robbery *Lobby the TUC on 7 September *Coordinate strikes on 14 October *Join the TUC London demo on 18 October www.socialistparty.o rg.uk SocialistParty-SomersetBranch
  • Score: -4

2:44pm Thu 21 Aug 14

SocialistParty-SomersetBranch says...

Workers in Britain have been hit by the biggest fall in pay since 1880. Increasingly, work simply does not pay! But as incomes drop, the anger is rising.

Average wages after inflation are down by more than £1,600 since 2010 - the biggest drop in any Parliament since Tory Benjamin Disraeli was prime minister.

Average real weekly earnings are 8% lower since the Con-Dems came to power and 15% lower for under-25s. No wonder an estimated half a million people a year will be receiving food parcels by 2016.

The Con-Dem government and its big business masters are taking us back to the 19th century with poverty pay and the destruction of public services.

Workers have got no option but to fight to break the attack on our living standards.

The public sector pay dispute will now continue into the autumn. Local government workers in the Unison, Unite and GMB unions will take strike action on 14 October.

The Socialist Party calls on all the public sector unions to immediately meet together to ensure that all of the one million-plus workers that struck on 10 July (J10) are involved.

This includes teachers and civil servants. But, with NHS workers also balloting, a strike of 30 November 2011 (N30) proportions is now possible.

Britain needs a pay rise

With the TUC's 'Britain needs a pay rise' demo called on 18 October, we could see a mobilisation on the scale of the mammoth 26 March 2011 demonstration that saw 750,000 workers march through London.

That march, coming a few months after Osborne's first austerity budget, seems an age ago.

The National Shop Stewards Network produced 40,000 flyers that day warning that we needed the 'fight of our lives' - that if the cuts went through it would be a catastrophe for working class people and the vast majority in society. Isn't that the reality for many today?

But this was not inevitable. The demonstration in March 2011 signalled the build-up to the pensions strike on N30.

Two million workers participated in the biggest single day of action since the 1926 General Strike.

It was a massive day with virtually every town and city seeing workers' rallies and marches. But instead of being the platform for further action, the TUC and conservative union leaders accepted the government's pensions deal.

The result was not just that the pensions strike was demobilised but the door was opened up to the full force of the cuts.

Undoubtedly, many activists have feared that history was repeating itself as the weeks passed since J10. Earlier dates in September were first floated, but 14 October is an opportunity to build generalised action that must be taken with both hands.

Low pay - no way

All public sector unions should be involved in the 14 October strike action. A real momentum can be built to get the maximum turnout.

Even during their well-earned summer holidays, many teachers in the NUT will be trying to put pressure on their union to ensure that they line up with school staff. There should be no need to wait around until October to confirm their participation.



The Socialist Party also calls on private sector unions to discuss how their members can coordinate action. Over the last year, we have seen a rash of disputes from workers at London Underground to Doncaster Care UK, Tyneside Safety Glass and Argos.

As we go to press, Ritzy Cinema workers in Lambeth are voting on whether to accept a deal that would in a year take them to the London Living Wage after an impressive struggle.

Thousands of private sector workers could be involved if there is a general call for any live disputes to be coordinated with the 14 October strike.

It is almost unprecedented that the unions are taking action on this scale so close to a general election.

When the POA prison officers' union successfully moved their general strike motion at the TUC Congress in 2012, the right-wing union leaders who opposed it argued instead that the unions 'should wait for a Labour government'. No doubt some leaders of those unions who took action on J10 are tempted by this argument.

On one hand, they lack the confidence that they can defeat the government, while on the other they don't want to expose Ed Miliband and the Labour leadership just eight months before the general election.

But working class people already see Labour in action in councils where it has simply wielded the Tory axe. And Miliband accepts austerity and the pay freeze that flows from it. The election will be a choice between pro-cuts parties.

Statement of intent

A victory in the pay dispute would not just be a major blow against Cameron. But it would also be a statement of intent against Miliband or whoever forms the next government - they will face a workers' movement that is prepared and able to resist cuts.

Scandalously, a majority of the union leaders at Labour's Policy Forum accepted Labour's spending plans which follow Tory austerity limits in return for minor concessions. This is a disastrous approach that will only demoralise activists.

The calling of the 14 October strike is a reflection of the real world - the real economic pain being suffered by workers and their families who cannot wait for the faint hope that Labour, if they win next May will lift the siege on their living standards. It is this mass pressure that is forcing the pay strikes to continue.

The strike planned for 14 October will be a significant step in the battle against austerity. In demonstrating in action their enormous potential power, the unions could draw behind them millions of, as yet, unorganised workers and all those suffering from these brutal cuts.

The idea of a 24-hour general strike has been pushed back by the cowardly actions of the right-wing trade union leaders. But the need for it is widely understood, even if the confidence is not there at this time.

The 14 October action has the potential to change this, bringing general strike action back to the forefront of workers' minds. This will open up the prospect of defeating this government and any government that acts in the interests of the 1%.

Therefore, union members have to keep the pressure on. If your union hasn't confirmed for 14 October, move a motion at your next branch. Come to the lobby of the TUC Congress that the NSSN has called on 7 September. That will be a more than useful forum to discuss how to keep the action going and broaden and deepen the dispute.

And inevitably, this campaign and the strikes themselves will pose the question of a political alternative. Just as they did on J10 and in 2011, workers striking in October will come up against the opposition of Labour politicians.

They fear a mobilised trade union movement as much as the Con-Dems. The building of a mass political voice for working class people would hugely increase that fear.

NSSN rally and lobby of the TUC Congress in Liverpool: 'Keep striking together for a pay rise'

Speakers include Mark Serwotka, PCS general secretary

2pm, Sunday 7 September

Jurys Hotel, opposite Echo Arena Conference Centre in Albert Dock

See www.shopstewards.net for more - email info@shopstewards.ne
t

www.socialistparty.o
rg.uk
Workers in Britain have been hit by the biggest fall in pay since 1880. Increasingly, work simply does not pay! But as incomes drop, the anger is rising. Average wages after inflation are down by more than £1,600 since 2010 - the biggest drop in any Parliament since Tory Benjamin Disraeli was prime minister. Average real weekly earnings are 8% lower since the Con-Dems came to power and 15% lower for under-25s. No wonder an estimated half a million people a year will be receiving food parcels by 2016. The Con-Dem government and its big business masters are taking us back to the 19th century with poverty pay and the destruction of public services. Workers have got no option but to fight to break the attack on our living standards. The public sector pay dispute will now continue into the autumn. Local government workers in the Unison, Unite and GMB unions will take strike action on 14 October. The Socialist Party calls on all the public sector unions to immediately meet together to ensure that all of the one million-plus workers that struck on 10 July (J10) are involved. This includes teachers and civil servants. But, with NHS workers also balloting, a strike of 30 November 2011 (N30) proportions is now possible. Britain needs a pay rise With the TUC's 'Britain needs a pay rise' demo called on 18 October, we could see a mobilisation on the scale of the mammoth 26 March 2011 demonstration that saw 750,000 workers march through London. That march, coming a few months after Osborne's first austerity budget, seems an age ago. The National Shop Stewards Network produced 40,000 flyers that day warning that we needed the 'fight of our lives' - that if the cuts went through it would be a catastrophe for working class people and the vast majority in society. Isn't that the reality for many today? But this was not inevitable. The demonstration in March 2011 signalled the build-up to the pensions strike on N30. Two million workers participated in the biggest single day of action since the 1926 General Strike. It was a massive day with virtually every town and city seeing workers' rallies and marches. But instead of being the platform for further action, the TUC and conservative union leaders accepted the government's pensions deal. The result was not just that the pensions strike was demobilised but the door was opened up to the full force of the cuts. Undoubtedly, many activists have feared that history was repeating itself as the weeks passed since J10. Earlier dates in September were first floated, but 14 October is an opportunity to build generalised action that must be taken with both hands. Low pay - no way All public sector unions should be involved in the 14 October strike action. A real momentum can be built to get the maximum turnout. Even during their well-earned summer holidays, many teachers in the NUT will be trying to put pressure on their union to ensure that they line up with school staff. There should be no need to wait around until October to confirm their participation. The Socialist Party also calls on private sector unions to discuss how their members can coordinate action. Over the last year, we have seen a rash of disputes from workers at London Underground to Doncaster Care UK, Tyneside Safety Glass and Argos. As we go to press, Ritzy Cinema workers in Lambeth are voting on whether to accept a deal that would in a year take them to the London Living Wage after an impressive struggle. Thousands of private sector workers could be involved if there is a general call for any live disputes to be coordinated with the 14 October strike. It is almost unprecedented that the unions are taking action on this scale so close to a general election. When the POA prison officers' union successfully moved their general strike motion at the TUC Congress in 2012, the right-wing union leaders who opposed it argued instead that the unions 'should wait for a Labour government'. No doubt some leaders of those unions who took action on J10 are tempted by this argument. On one hand, they lack the confidence that they can defeat the government, while on the other they don't want to expose Ed Miliband and the Labour leadership just eight months before the general election. But working class people already see Labour in action in councils where it has simply wielded the Tory axe. And Miliband accepts austerity and the pay freeze that flows from it. The election will be a choice between pro-cuts parties. Statement of intent A victory in the pay dispute would not just be a major blow against Cameron. But it would also be a statement of intent against Miliband or whoever forms the next government - they will face a workers' movement that is prepared and able to resist cuts. Scandalously, a majority of the union leaders at Labour's Policy Forum accepted Labour's spending plans which follow Tory austerity limits in return for minor concessions. This is a disastrous approach that will only demoralise activists. The calling of the 14 October strike is a reflection of the real world - the real economic pain being suffered by workers and their families who cannot wait for the faint hope that Labour, if they win next May will lift the siege on their living standards. It is this mass pressure that is forcing the pay strikes to continue. The strike planned for 14 October will be a significant step in the battle against austerity. In demonstrating in action their enormous potential power, the unions could draw behind them millions of, as yet, unorganised workers and all those suffering from these brutal cuts. The idea of a 24-hour general strike has been pushed back by the cowardly actions of the right-wing trade union leaders. But the need for it is widely understood, even if the confidence is not there at this time. The 14 October action has the potential to change this, bringing general strike action back to the forefront of workers' minds. This will open up the prospect of defeating this government and any government that acts in the interests of the 1%. Therefore, union members have to keep the pressure on. If your union hasn't confirmed for 14 October, move a motion at your next branch. Come to the lobby of the TUC Congress that the NSSN has called on 7 September. That will be a more than useful forum to discuss how to keep the action going and broaden and deepen the dispute. And inevitably, this campaign and the strikes themselves will pose the question of a political alternative. Just as they did on J10 and in 2011, workers striking in October will come up against the opposition of Labour politicians. They fear a mobilised trade union movement as much as the Con-Dems. The building of a mass political voice for working class people would hugely increase that fear. NSSN rally and lobby of the TUC Congress in Liverpool: 'Keep striking together for a pay rise' Speakers include Mark Serwotka, PCS general secretary 2pm, Sunday 7 September Jurys Hotel, opposite Echo Arena Conference Centre in Albert Dock See www.shopstewards.net for more - email info@shopstewards.ne t www.socialistparty.o rg.uk SocialistParty-SomersetBranch
  • Score: -5

11:04am Fri 22 Aug 14

topcataj says...

Blue Owl wrote:
The problem with these Civil Servants, is that the " Jobs" are within Pay grades, across the Whole Civil Service, in the UK.
Therefore, the whole work ethics of these overpaid Civil Servants
, ( Servants they certain taint are Not !! Is to jump upgrade within to higher pay scale levels each year, by jumping through internal hoops.
Thus awarding higher Grading and Pay Structures !!! With the additional Pensions that are the Goals of all !!!! They need to look at the real world outside of the Councils Workers regime, the rest of us have to endure shrinking Pensions, not protected like theirs.
All you hear about is how bad off they are, by their Union ' Unite', who's
Salaries would also be good to Know ???
David L Preece
Blue-Owl
I don't have any desire to support local government senior management but most of this is wrong.

Local Government staff are not civil servants. Some (Many?) Councils have the more senior managers on fixed pay rather than pay ranges with automatic annual increments.

There are apparently around 350 local government organisations through the UK http://en.wikipedia.
org/wiki/Local_gover
nment_in_England
Expenditure in Local Authorities in England is apparently around £170billion/year https://www.gov.uk/g
overnment/uploads/sy
stem/uploads/attachm
ent_data/file/7476/2
158981.pdf
Around 2 million people are employed by local government http://www.ons.gov.u
k/ons/rel/pse/public
-sector-employment/r
egional-analysis-of-
public-sector-employ
ment--2012/index.htm
l

And 2,000 people earn over £100,000..... an average of about 6.5 people per organisation earning those levels of pay.
A slightly different scale to the millions being 'earnt' by fat cat private sector bosses that we are repeatedly told need those massive salaries to get the best people. Despite that they don't seem to do a lot either and happily get their massive payouts to leave when things go pear shaped.
[quote][p][bold]Blue Owl[/bold] wrote: The problem with these Civil Servants, is that the " Jobs" are within Pay grades, across the Whole Civil Service, in the UK. Therefore, the whole work ethics of these overpaid Civil Servants , ( Servants they certain taint are Not !! Is to jump upgrade within to higher pay scale levels each year, by jumping through internal hoops. Thus awarding higher Grading and Pay Structures !!! With the additional Pensions that are the Goals of all !!!! They need to look at the real world outside of the Councils Workers regime, the rest of us have to endure shrinking Pensions, not protected like theirs. All you hear about is how bad off they are, by their Union ' Unite', who's Salaries would also be good to Know ??? David L Preece Blue-Owl[/p][/quote]I don't have any desire to support local government senior management but most of this is wrong. Local Government staff are not civil servants. Some (Many?) Councils have the more senior managers on fixed pay rather than pay ranges with automatic annual increments. There are apparently around 350 local government organisations through the UK http://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/Local_gover nment_in_England Expenditure in Local Authorities in England is apparently around £170billion/year https://www.gov.uk/g overnment/uploads/sy stem/uploads/attachm ent_data/file/7476/2 158981.pdf Around 2 million people are employed by local government http://www.ons.gov.u k/ons/rel/pse/public -sector-employment/r egional-analysis-of- public-sector-employ ment--2012/index.htm l And 2,000 people earn over £100,000..... an average of about 6.5 people per organisation earning those levels of pay. A slightly different scale to the millions being 'earnt' by fat cat private sector bosses that we are repeatedly told need those massive salaries to get the best people. Despite that they don't seem to do a lot either and happily get their massive payouts to leave when things go pear shaped. topcataj
  • Score: -1

10:28pm Fri 22 Aug 14

Guy Smiley says...

Nearly 40 union leaders earn over £100,000 a year.

Len McCluskey (Unite the Union) earned £122,434 in 2010/11
Christine Blower (NUT) earned £142,363 in 2010/11

Keep on paying your subs. The champagne socialists are loving it!!
Nearly 40 union leaders earn over £100,000 a year. Len McCluskey (Unite the Union) earned £122,434 in 2010/11 Christine Blower (NUT) earned £142,363 in 2010/11 Keep on paying your subs. The champagne socialists are loving it!! Guy Smiley
  • Score: 2

11:33pm Fri 22 Aug 14

Blue Owl says...

Guy Smiley wrote:
Nearly 40 union leaders earn over £100,000 a year.

Len McCluskey (Unite the Union) earned £122,434 in 2010/11
Christine Blower (NUT) earned £142,363 in 2010/11

Keep on paying your subs. The champagne socialists are loving it!!
Thanks Guy for submitting those Salaries, it is in line with my thoughts, similar to the Union of Railworkers Boss who passed away earlier this year, and his Salary was reported, no wonder he was able to have his holiday in Brazil ?? Before joining his Union Members on the Imposed Picketlines, by his Union.
Have our fellow posters noted how the SSP have had to post their Rhethoric 3 times to get their point across, or not !!!.
I for one never read the first post ?????????
He goes on about the Media Press Barons !!! Why should not the Boss of a News Business, Corp. Be able to command a return on his investment. It's his and fellow Shareholders that are risking their Capital.
One wonders, how much the pay scale is within the Somerset Socialist Party, once is enough, will do nicely.
What is the income of the SSP, and who are your financial backers.
David L Preece
Blue- Owl
[quote][p][bold]Guy Smiley[/bold] wrote: Nearly 40 union leaders earn over £100,000 a year. Len McCluskey (Unite the Union) earned £122,434 in 2010/11 Christine Blower (NUT) earned £142,363 in 2010/11 Keep on paying your subs. The champagne socialists are loving it!![/p][/quote]Thanks Guy for submitting those Salaries, it is in line with my thoughts, similar to the Union of Railworkers Boss who passed away earlier this year, and his Salary was reported, no wonder he was able to have his holiday in Brazil ?? Before joining his Union Members on the Imposed Picketlines, by his Union. Have our fellow posters noted how the SSP have had to post their Rhethoric 3 times to get their point across, or not !!!. I for one never read the first post ????????? He goes on about the Media Press Barons !!! Why should not the Boss of a News Business, Corp. Be able to command a return on his investment. It's his and fellow Shareholders that are risking their Capital. One wonders, how much the pay scale is within the Somerset Socialist Party, once is enough, will do nicely. What is the income of the SSP, and who are your financial backers. David L Preece Blue- Owl Blue Owl
  • Score: 1
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