Passengers are biggest distraction in car

Passengers are biggest distraction in car

Passengers are biggest distraction in car

First published in Somerset

THE biggest distraction for drivers is other people in the car, according to a survey by the AA.

Adult passengers are the most distracting with 18% of drivers saying they have had a near miss or crashed because of their attention being drawn away by someone else in the car.

The survey found adjusting the radio was the second biggest distraction with 16% of drivers admitting they had narrowly avoided a collision or been in a crash while fiddling with the dial.

Other major distractions include children (15%), working a satellite navigation system (13%), talking on a mobile phone (12%) and eating a sandwich (9%).

Drivers also cited drinking (7%) as a reason for not paying attention to the road ahead and around them.

More reasons for being distracted while driving include texting (5%), emailing (1%), checking social media (1%) and smoking (1%).

Out of the drivers surveyed, 1.5% said they had been in a collision due to being distracted.

Government figures show that in the past year there were 88 road deaths in the UK attributed to driver distraction and 17 were directly attributed to mobile phone use.

Edmund King, AA president, said : “Though human distractions remain the biggest in-car threat, the figures for sat-navs and mobile phones give a warning for what might happen in the future as ‘infotainment’ and other technology become more commonplace.

“The higher kill rate for mobile phone-related reported accidents provides a strong wake-up call.

“The Transport Secretary has floated the idea of six penalty points for using a hand-held mobile.

“If this proposal was backed by an information and enforcement campaign it could begin to change the daily dangers that the majority of our members see with drivers texting and tweeting at the wheel.

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:43pm Wed 6 Aug 14

Anonymous Me says...

I'm not surprised that these accidents happen, everyday I see someone driving in front of me, with their arms waving about while talking to a passenger, and why do some people have to look at the person they are talking to while driving, KEEP YOUR EYES ON THE ROAD you don't have to have eye to eye contact during a conversation!
I'm not surprised that these accidents happen, everyday I see someone driving in front of me, with their arms waving about while talking to a passenger, and why do some people have to look at the person they are talking to while driving, KEEP YOUR EYES ON THE ROAD you don't have to have eye to eye contact during a conversation! Anonymous Me
  • Score: 10

1:22pm Wed 6 Aug 14

KevinTurvey says...

A significant category has been missed here. Is nose-picking, particularly one's own, a distraction or aid to concentration? " JML" are behind the curve not yet having come up with a hands-free appliance for this essential function to well turned-out lady drivers of a certain age . A case of niche marketing if ever there was one.
A significant category has been missed here. Is nose-picking, particularly one's own, a distraction or aid to concentration? " JML" are behind the curve not yet having come up with a hands-free appliance for this essential function to well turned-out lady drivers of a certain age . A case of niche marketing if ever there was one. KevinTurvey
  • Score: 3

3:53pm Wed 6 Aug 14

Baldbloke says...

KevinTurvey wrote:
A significant category has been missed here. Is nose-picking, particularly one's own, a distraction or aid to concentration? " JML" are behind the curve not yet having come up with a hands-free appliance for this essential function to well turned-out lady drivers of a certain age . A case of niche marketing if ever there was one.
...only a distraction when a strategically-placed nasal hair also gets picked and makes your eyes water :-)

Joking aside, there are far too many distractions when driving, and lack of enforcement simply encourages people to do it because the chances of being caught are minimal...
[quote][p][bold]KevinTurvey[/bold] wrote: A significant category has been missed here. Is nose-picking, particularly one's own, a distraction or aid to concentration? " JML" are behind the curve not yet having come up with a hands-free appliance for this essential function to well turned-out lady drivers of a certain age . A case of niche marketing if ever there was one.[/p][/quote]...only a distraction when a strategically-placed nasal hair also gets picked and makes your eyes water :-) Joking aside, there are far too many distractions when driving, and lack of enforcement simply encourages people to do it because the chances of being caught are minimal... Baldbloke
  • Score: 3

4:46pm Wed 6 Aug 14

blackmasquerade says...

If the picture is anything to go by then frankly I'm not surprised - no hands (paws) on the wheel I notice though in fairness they do seem to be keeping their eyes on the road but that's Rover drivers for you...

Seriously though, I am appalled at the number of drivers spotted daily using their mobile whilst driving. Those who use their vehicle as their office should be on hands-free (inc white van man), whereas anyone else should either use h/f or just leave it alone. What is so important that people feel compelled to answer the phone anyway? Personally I don't care what happens to them if through their own stupidity they should injure themselves or worse but it's the innocent ones I'm concerned about - those who through no fault of their own are caught up in such atrocities.

Agree with Baldbloke that the chances of getting caught are minimal but if the courts were to start dishing out maximum fines might get people thinking I suppose
If the picture is anything to go by then frankly I'm not surprised - no hands (paws) on the wheel I notice though in fairness they do seem to be keeping their eyes on the road but that's Rover drivers for you... Seriously though, I am appalled at the number of drivers spotted daily using their mobile whilst driving. Those who use their vehicle as their office should be on hands-free (inc white van man), whereas anyone else should either use h/f or just leave it alone. What is so important that people feel compelled to answer the phone anyway? Personally I don't care what happens to them if through their own stupidity they should injure themselves or worse but it's the innocent ones I'm concerned about - those who through no fault of their own are caught up in such atrocities. Agree with Baldbloke that the chances of getting caught are minimal but if the courts were to start dishing out maximum fines might get people thinking I suppose blackmasquerade
  • Score: 9

8:43am Thu 7 Aug 14

QuillPen says...

Mobile phones are useful tools but bad masters.

People seem to have them permanently glued to their ears. As Blackmasquerade says, what's so urgent it can't wait? How did we manage before mobile phones. I have one but rarely use it. Useful when meeting people to confirm if on time or held up but that's about it.
Mobile phones are useful tools but bad masters. People seem to have them permanently glued to their ears. As Blackmasquerade says, what's so urgent it can't wait? How did we manage before mobile phones. I have one but rarely use it. Useful when meeting people to confirm if on time or held up but that's about it. QuillPen
  • Score: 5

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree