Council music teachers to lose their jobs in cost cutting drive

This is The West Country: Council music teachers to lose their jobs in cost cutting drive Council music teachers to lose their jobs in cost cutting drive

Music teachers employed by Cornwall Council are to lose their jobs as the authority decides to stop funding the service in a bid to cut costs.

Members of Cornwall Council’s cabinet have given the go ahead to a proposal which will see music teaching in schools in Cornwall delivered in a “different way” in the future.

A council spokesman said: “Over the past few months the authority has reviewed a number of different options to set up a sustainable cost neutral model which will enable schools to continue to access music tuition, including an improved in house model. “However, following a discussion at the children and young people portfolio advisory committee in March it was agreed the only sustainable long term option was a brokerage model.”

Under this model music teachers would move from being directly employed by the Council to being self employed and registered with the Council as approved to provide music tuition.

The Music Tuition service is one of three strands of the wider Cornwall Music Service, which is part of Cornwall Learning. The remaining two strands – Music Hub and the music therapy service - are not affected by this decision.

The Music Tuition service employs 70 music teachers who provide music education and instrumental and vocal tuition to schools throughout Cornwall. Under the current model schools and parents are charged £39 per hour for lessons, which the authority says is higher than many other providers. A spokesman for the council said that although the service was originally set up to be cost neutral, it has not generated enough income to meet its costs, “resulting in the Council being forced to provide an annual subsidy to enable the service to continue”.

This service has had an over spend of over £450,000 for the last two years, and as this is a cost neutral service, this overspend must be addressed to enable the Council to meet its budget.

With cuts of £196 m in Government funding expected over the next five years Andrew Wallis, the Council’s Cabinet Member for Children and Young People, said that the scale of the financial situation now facing the authority meant they could no longer afford to subsidise the service.

“While I understand the importance of music to children and schools, the Council cannot go on subsiding this service without cutting other services we provide to children and young people in Cornwall “he said.

“This model is financially sustainable and, if there is sufficient take up from music tutors and schools, will continue to provide access to music tuition across Cornwall” said Andrew Wallis. “It will also be open to all suitable music teachers, which may increase the range of tutors available to schools and parents. “ The council will now consult formally with staff and unions with a view to implementing the new brokerage model by January 1, 2015. Some staff had previously offered to discuss making changes to their terms and conditions as an alternative to setting up a brokerage option. Members also agreed that any proposals which came forward as a result of the formal negotiations which were found to be financially and legally sound would be brought back to the Cabinet for further consideration.

Comments (7)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

1:48pm Tue 13 May 14

'locallad87' says...

This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.
This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this. 'locallad87'
  • Score: -1

1:49pm Tue 13 May 14

'locallad87' says...

'locallad87' wrote:
This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.
*hear
[quote][p][bold]'locallad87'[/bold] wrote: This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.[/p][/quote]*hear 'locallad87'
  • Score: -1

9:29pm Tue 13 May 14

Levener says...

'locallad87' wrote:
This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.
"with cuts of 196 million in government funding expected over the next five years "

You ask what the council is spending its money on. Do you not think perhaps it is prioritising its funds on essential services.

The council has to forward plan alongside this years cut in funding, music tuition cannot take precedence in its current form, over basic provision of other schools services. Everyone has their favourite hobby/tuition choice, but those opting for specific musical instrument tuition are not generally in the majority within a school.

Instead of firing the bullets in the direction of Cllr. Andrew Wallis, maybe you should be directing them at the government.
[quote][p][bold]'locallad87'[/bold] wrote: This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.[/p][/quote]"with cuts of 196 million in government funding expected over the next five years " You ask what the council is spending its money on. Do you not think perhaps it is prioritising its funds on essential services. The council has to forward plan alongside this years cut in funding, music tuition cannot take precedence in its current form, over basic provision of other schools services. Everyone has their favourite hobby/tuition choice, but those opting for specific musical instrument tuition are not generally in the majority within a school. Instead of firing the bullets in the direction of Cllr. Andrew Wallis, maybe you should be directing them at the government. Levener
  • Score: 9

6:58am Thu 15 May 14

DCI Jen says...

Levener wrote:
'locallad87' wrote:
This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.
"with cuts of 196 million in government funding expected over the next five years "

You ask what the council is spending its money on. Do you not think perhaps it is prioritising its funds on essential services.

The council has to forward plan alongside this years cut in funding, music tuition cannot take precedence in its current form, over basic provision of other schools services. Everyone has their favourite hobby/tuition choice, but those opting for specific musical instrument tuition are not generally in the majority within a school.

Instead of firing the bullets in the direction of Cllr. Andrew Wallis, maybe you should be directing them at the government.
Ermm, sounds familiar, I'm inclined to agree with you.

I hope all those that complain don't vote Conservative.
[quote][p][bold]Levener[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]'locallad87'[/bold] wrote: This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.[/p][/quote]"with cuts of 196 million in government funding expected over the next five years " You ask what the council is spending its money on. Do you not think perhaps it is prioritising its funds on essential services. The council has to forward plan alongside this years cut in funding, music tuition cannot take precedence in its current form, over basic provision of other schools services. Everyone has their favourite hobby/tuition choice, but those opting for specific musical instrument tuition are not generally in the majority within a school. Instead of firing the bullets in the direction of Cllr. Andrew Wallis, maybe you should be directing them at the government.[/p][/quote]Ermm, sounds familiar, I'm inclined to agree with you. I hope all those that complain don't vote Conservative. DCI Jen
  • Score: 6

12:05pm Thu 15 May 14

'locallad87' says...

Levener wrote:
'locallad87' wrote:
This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.
"with cuts of 196 million in government funding expected over the next five years "

You ask what the council is spending its money on. Do you not think perhaps it is prioritising its funds on essential services.

The council has to forward plan alongside this years cut in funding, music tuition cannot take precedence in its current form, over basic provision of other schools services. Everyone has their favourite hobby/tuition choice, but those opting for specific musical instrument tuition are not generally in the majority within a school.

Instead of firing the bullets in the direction of Cllr. Andrew Wallis, maybe you should be directing them at the government.
Your first mistake clearly shows you struggle to read; I am well aware that the council have had to make cuts, I also understand it needs to prioritise it's funding towards 'essential' services. Having already heard about various cuts; that have detrimental impacts on our communities, I was simply curious to see just what services are classed as essential. Forgive me for appearing 'naive', but I don't see any council money being spent. Secondly, council money is government money. Regardless of whether it is county, town or parish; it all comes from the same pot. Yet, our councils continue to waist money, and then complain when the government want some back, this being the money given to them in the first place. Now obviously that is the most simplest form of how money is shared around; plead advise if I am wrong? Thirdly, you are clearly not a musician; music to some could be considered as a 'hobby' or a pass time. Fundamentally, music is a passion, it is a talent and it is an art. I am not suggesting that they should spend what little money they have on music when it needs to be used to provide essential bus services, but, they don't appear to be able to manage that either. My point about the music service is that children that are either, underprivilege, or from a poor background won't be given the chance to show their potential or talent without the help and guidance from those able to give it. Perhaps of you pop along to Truro Cathedral, which by the way, has one of the best choirs in the country, and ask them how they view their 'hobby'. So please before you get on your soapbox, don't insult musicians. Regarding comments directed toward Mr Wallis. I have no issue with him, I know nothing about him, all I know is that he is the chap in the know.
[quote][p][bold]Levener[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]'locallad87'[/bold] wrote: This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.[/p][/quote]"with cuts of 196 million in government funding expected over the next five years " You ask what the council is spending its money on. Do you not think perhaps it is prioritising its funds on essential services. The council has to forward plan alongside this years cut in funding, music tuition cannot take precedence in its current form, over basic provision of other schools services. Everyone has their favourite hobby/tuition choice, but those opting for specific musical instrument tuition are not generally in the majority within a school. Instead of firing the bullets in the direction of Cllr. Andrew Wallis, maybe you should be directing them at the government.[/p][/quote]Your first mistake clearly shows you struggle to read; I am well aware that the council have had to make cuts, I also understand it needs to prioritise it's funding towards 'essential' services. Having already heard about various cuts; that have detrimental impacts on our communities, I was simply curious to see just what services are classed as essential. Forgive me for appearing 'naive', but I don't see any council money being spent. Secondly, council money is government money. Regardless of whether it is county, town or parish; it all comes from the same pot. Yet, our councils continue to waist money, and then complain when the government want some back, this being the money given to them in the first place. Now obviously that is the most simplest form of how money is shared around; plead advise if I am wrong? Thirdly, you are clearly not a musician; music to some could be considered as a 'hobby' or a pass time. Fundamentally, music is a passion, it is a talent and it is an art. I am not suggesting that they should spend what little money they have on music when it needs to be used to provide essential bus services, but, they don't appear to be able to manage that either. My point about the music service is that children that are either, underprivilege, or from a poor background won't be given the chance to show their potential or talent without the help and guidance from those able to give it. Perhaps of you pop along to Truro Cathedral, which by the way, has one of the best choirs in the country, and ask them how they view their 'hobby'. So please before you get on your soapbox, don't insult musicians. Regarding comments directed toward Mr Wallis. I have no issue with him, I know nothing about him, all I know is that he is the chap in the know. 'locallad87'
  • Score: -7

4:01pm Thu 15 May 14

Levener says...

'locallad87' wrote:
Levener wrote:
'locallad87' wrote:
This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.
"with cuts of 196 million in government funding expected over the next five years "

You ask what the council is spending its money on. Do you not think perhaps it is prioritising its funds on essential services.

The council has to forward plan alongside this years cut in funding, music tuition cannot take precedence in its current form, over basic provision of other schools services. Everyone has their favourite hobby/tuition choice, but those opting for specific musical instrument tuition are not generally in the majority within a school.

Instead of firing the bullets in the direction of Cllr. Andrew Wallis, maybe you should be directing them at the government.
Your first mistake clearly shows you struggle to read; I am well aware that the council have had to make cuts, I also understand it needs to prioritise it's funding towards 'essential' services. Having already heard about various cuts; that have detrimental impacts on our communities, I was simply curious to see just what services are classed as essential. Forgive me for appearing 'naive', but I don't see any council money being spent. Secondly, council money is government money. Regardless of whether it is county, town or parish; it all comes from the same pot. Yet, our councils continue to waist money, and then complain when the government want some back, this being the money given to them in the first place. Now obviously that is the most simplest form of how money is shared around; plead advise if I am wrong? Thirdly, you are clearly not a musician; music to some could be considered as a 'hobby' or a pass time. Fundamentally, music is a passion, it is a talent and it is an art. I am not suggesting that they should spend what little money they have on music when it needs to be used to provide essential bus services, but, they don't appear to be able to manage that either. My point about the music service is that children that are either, underprivilege, or from a poor background won't be given the chance to show their potential or talent without the help and guidance from those able to give it. Perhaps of you pop along to Truro Cathedral, which by the way, has one of the best choirs in the country, and ask them how they view their 'hobby'. So please before you get on your soapbox, don't insult musicians. Regarding comments directed toward Mr Wallis. I have no issue with him, I know nothing about him, all I know is that he is the chap in the know.
If I wanted to be as blatantly rude as you, (no I do not struggle to read) I could suggest you struggle to spell!! Do the council "waist" money? etc. How about we just stick to the debate. I find no nessessity in verbally aggressive debates.

For you to say you don't see any council money being spent, is contradictory to your statement the council wastes money. Of course there is council money being spent on various services, it may not be what you would like it to be spent on but obviously money is being spent.

I will point out your assumptions are wrong.
I am married to someone who is a Dr of music, used to teach music, a qualified piano tuner, etc, and I and my husband also play and own various instruments.

The children are still going to have music tuition available to them, just supplied by a more cost effective module.
[quote][p][bold]'locallad87'[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Levener[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]'locallad87'[/bold] wrote: This is an absolute outrage. Would somebody please explain to me, where exactly the councils money goes? Evidently, it is not used for half of the services that they are supposed to provide. I can't see how they are not 'obliged' to provide musical education. I myself am a musician; I learnt to play one of my instruments through school, and the county music service. Clearly Mr Wallis is not a musician, 'he understands the importance of music lessons'. Without these vital lessons, children don't have the ability for their potential to be brought to light, nurtured and developed. Newspapers, police and councils frequently complain about children hanging around on streets etc; allowing them access to play in music groups, orchestras and bands provides just the right kind of place. I know that services will probably be provided (and better) if we are honest. But it staggers me to here that the council can no longer fund this.[/p][/quote]"with cuts of 196 million in government funding expected over the next five years " You ask what the council is spending its money on. Do you not think perhaps it is prioritising its funds on essential services. The council has to forward plan alongside this years cut in funding, music tuition cannot take precedence in its current form, over basic provision of other schools services. Everyone has their favourite hobby/tuition choice, but those opting for specific musical instrument tuition are not generally in the majority within a school. Instead of firing the bullets in the direction of Cllr. Andrew Wallis, maybe you should be directing them at the government.[/p][/quote]Your first mistake clearly shows you struggle to read; I am well aware that the council have had to make cuts, I also understand it needs to prioritise it's funding towards 'essential' services. Having already heard about various cuts; that have detrimental impacts on our communities, I was simply curious to see just what services are classed as essential. Forgive me for appearing 'naive', but I don't see any council money being spent. Secondly, council money is government money. Regardless of whether it is county, town or parish; it all comes from the same pot. Yet, our councils continue to waist money, and then complain when the government want some back, this being the money given to them in the first place. Now obviously that is the most simplest form of how money is shared around; plead advise if I am wrong? Thirdly, you are clearly not a musician; music to some could be considered as a 'hobby' or a pass time. Fundamentally, music is a passion, it is a talent and it is an art. I am not suggesting that they should spend what little money they have on music when it needs to be used to provide essential bus services, but, they don't appear to be able to manage that either. My point about the music service is that children that are either, underprivilege, or from a poor background won't be given the chance to show their potential or talent without the help and guidance from those able to give it. Perhaps of you pop along to Truro Cathedral, which by the way, has one of the best choirs in the country, and ask them how they view their 'hobby'. So please before you get on your soapbox, don't insult musicians. Regarding comments directed toward Mr Wallis. I have no issue with him, I know nothing about him, all I know is that he is the chap in the know.[/p][/quote]If I wanted to be as blatantly rude as you, (no I do not struggle to read) I could suggest you struggle to spell!! Do the council "waist" money? etc. How about we just stick to the debate. I find no nessessity in verbally aggressive debates. For you to say you don't see any council money being spent, is contradictory to your statement the council wastes money. Of course there is council money being spent on various services, it may not be what you would like it to be spent on but obviously money is being spent. I will point out your assumptions are wrong. I am married to someone who is a Dr of music, used to teach music, a qualified piano tuner, etc, and I and my husband also play and own various instruments. The children are still going to have music tuition available to them, just supplied by a more cost effective module. Levener
  • Score: 7

9:50am Tue 20 May 14

webpractice says...

We provide music resources on line for schools at £60 per year and up to 30 licences per school just so the children do not lose out on music practise and learning. This does not replace a good tutor, but it helps music teachers to be more efficient with their time. The children can practise in their own time instead of with the tutor, and the tutor is freed up to teach rather than listen to practise each week
Robert Winter webpractice.co.uk
We provide music resources on line for schools at £60 per year and up to 30 licences per school just so the children do not lose out on music practise and learning. This does not replace a good tutor, but it helps music teachers to be more efficient with their time. The children can practise in their own time instead of with the tutor, and the tutor is freed up to teach rather than listen to practise each week Robert Winter webpractice.co.uk webpractice
  • Score: 1

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree