Have your say on safety bugbears to help police target resources

Police are asking people to let them know their concerns so they can target resources to where they matter.

People can give their views about safety concerns in their communities this March using the Devon and Cornwall Police and Safer Cornwall annual survey, available below.

The Safer Cornwall ‘Have your say’ survey aims to measure residents’ feelings on safety year on year and to help target resources to address crime, disorder and anti-social behaviour.

Safer Cornwall’s partner agencies will also be gathering paper responses in our priority towns including Penzance, Redruth, Camborne, Falmouth, Newquay, St Austell, Bodmin and Liskeard.”

A council spokesman said: "The results of the annual survey are vital in making the best use of limited and in some cases diminishing resources. Accurate information will allow for effective and best value targeting of problem areas."

Any staff conducting face-to-face surveys will always carry identification.

The survey only takes three or four minutes and can be completed online at safercornwall.co.uk.

Comments (5)

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3:02pm Sat 2 Mar 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

Yes don't worry about Helston or the rural villages with the paper responses, just the fact that villages tend to have a high proportion of elderly people who have no Internet access. Sounds like just the right action to get a non accurate result. Perhaps we are being 'filtered out'
Yes don't worry about Helston or the rural villages with the paper responses, just the fact that villages tend to have a high proportion of elderly people who have no Internet access. Sounds like just the right action to get a non accurate result. Perhaps we are being 'filtered out' Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

4:22pm Sat 2 Mar 13

meerkats says...

How is this going to help in the increase of rural crimes ?
How is this going to help in the increase of rural crimes ? meerkats
  • Score: 0

9:00pm Sat 2 Mar 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

Will the survey results be accurate anyway because some people's fear of crime is actually greater than the actual crime rates. One persons perspective of a situation could be completely contradictory to another person residing in the same area. I do not believe it is financially viable just to address the issue of the fear of crime.
Who decides which crimes are high priority within the lower crime offence spectrum, I could suggest there should be a police presence to prevent people driving whilst using a mobile phone in rural areas, whilst someone else may put the emphasis on rowdiness outside a local pub at dinner time, I suspect the pub would be voted the priority and yet in reality it could be that the drivers using the mobile phones cause a road traffic collision and the rowdiness outside the pub is just high spirits.
For the higher offence spectrum one cannot really plan or target specific areas because who knows when something like a bank raid is likely to take place. Then there is the fuel consideration, is it worth the fuel cost just to cruise around looking for crime.
Is it worth having a police officer walking round a town all day wearing their shoes out and nothing happening whilst in the local park someone is busy removing the plants. Even if a town or village had a police presence, what if no one saw it, then they wouldn't be any the wiser so would they feel any safer anyway.

Kent police conducted a survey once just to find out why some young people hang around on street corners and commit crimes, the survey I believe cost around £10,000, would that money not have been better spent on facilities for young people.
How much is this survey costing ? Who is paying for it ? Unless every resident responds to the survey in my view it will be flawed.
Will the survey results be accurate anyway because some people's fear of crime is actually greater than the actual crime rates. One persons perspective of a situation could be completely contradictory to another person residing in the same area. I do not believe it is financially viable just to address the issue of the fear of crime. Who decides which crimes are high priority within the lower crime offence spectrum, I could suggest there should be a police presence to prevent people driving whilst using a mobile phone in rural areas, whilst someone else may put the emphasis on rowdiness outside a local pub at dinner time, I suspect the pub would be voted the priority and yet in reality it could be that the drivers using the mobile phones cause a road traffic collision and the rowdiness outside the pub is just high spirits. For the higher offence spectrum one cannot really plan or target specific areas because who knows when something like a bank raid is likely to take place. Then there is the fuel consideration, is it worth the fuel cost just to cruise around looking for crime. Is it worth having a police officer walking round a town all day wearing their shoes out and nothing happening whilst in the local park someone is busy removing the plants. Even if a town or village had a police presence, what if no one saw it, then they wouldn't be any the wiser so would they feel any safer anyway. Kent police conducted a survey once just to find out why some young people hang around on street corners and commit crimes, the survey I believe cost around £10,000, would that money not have been better spent on facilities for young people. How much is this survey costing ? Who is paying for it ? Unless every resident responds to the survey in my view it will be flawed. Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

9:38pm Sat 2 Mar 13

Wave says...

Using your point Gill, although more people are harmed though lack of road safety, it is not something that scares or concerns us much. As humans we haven't evolved much ability to be scared of traffic accidents or risk of them. But we are very good at having a constant background fear of human on human violence or risks of violent crime. Even if there is none or little.
So as a majority for our benefit its better to spend resources on things that don't make statistical sense but rather psychological sense. In terms of happiness, comfort and well being. This is more important than one day being killed instantly by an errant car. That is a tiny moment of a life compared to a whole life of worry.

A suggestion of mine is a bit forward thinking.

It has little to do with policing, as our current politics sees it. But If the remit of the police is to help prevent crime then perhaps a portion of their budget can be spent on researching new forms of society, culture, morality and education. The study could benefit some in the future, but to benefit us now it could mean voluntary practical experiments in isolated land areas containing a community, where life is "different".
It would be a scientific project to run indefinitely.
It might end up in creating a new kind of human. Whether that would be good or bad is an unknown, but the point is in the trying.
You have to start somewhere.
Using your point Gill, although more people are harmed though lack of road safety, it is not something that scares or concerns us much. As humans we haven't evolved much ability to be scared of traffic accidents or risk of them. But we are very good at having a constant background fear of human on human violence or risks of violent crime. Even if there is none or little. So as a majority for our benefit its better to spend resources on things that don't make statistical sense but rather psychological sense. In terms of happiness, comfort and well being. This is more important than one day being killed instantly by an errant car. That is a tiny moment of a life compared to a whole life of worry. A suggestion of mine is a bit forward thinking. It has little to do with policing, as our current politics sees it. But If the remit of the police is to help prevent crime then perhaps a portion of their budget can be spent on researching new forms of society, culture, morality and education. The study could benefit some in the future, but to benefit us now it could mean voluntary practical experiments in isolated land areas containing a community, where life is "different". It would be a scientific project to run indefinitely. It might end up in creating a new kind of human. Whether that would be good or bad is an unknown, but the point is in the trying. You have to start somewhere. Wave
  • Score: 0

7:19am Sun 3 Mar 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

In otherwords an alternative society, they could call it Ekanta.
In otherwords an alternative society, they could call it Ekanta. Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

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