Summerfield to host cream tea open day in West Somerset

Richard Nicol, divisional sales director for Summerfield, and Juliet Mountford, sales negotiator at Summerfield.

Richard Nicol, divisional sales director for Summerfield, and Juliet Mountford, sales negotiator at Summerfield.

First published in News

DEVELOPER Summerfield is holding cream tea open days to help homebuyers in Minehead and Williton.

It is giving an internal decorations package worth £3,000 to anyone who reserves a property before August 8 at their College Gardens development in Minehead or The Paddocks in Williton.

Homebuyers will be able to choose from a variety of carpets and blinds sourced locally to support Somerset businesses.

The cream tea open day will take place today (July 12) at both sites from 10am-2pm.

Taunton charity St Margaret’s Hospice will benefit too as there will be a chance to make a donation to them on the day.

Each property sale completed in 2014 will see the charity receive £100.

Richard Nicol, divisional sales director, said: “Our open day on July 12 will allow viewers to discuss their plans with suppliers at College Gardens while giving them the chance to make considerable savings by reserving a home.”

Comments (1)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

11:07am Sat 12 Jul 14

SocialistParty-SomersetBranch says...

Why is there a housing crisis?

The Daily Telegraph predicted that 2014 will be another profitable year for homeowners, suggesting that "the spring could be a great time to go for that investment-****-count
ry-house you have had your eye on."

What a luxury for a privileged few, to be able to snap up another property, sit back and watch the value soar! A stark contrast to the situation that most of us are facing.

Homelessness in England has increased by a third since 2010, and home ownership is now at its lowest level in 25 years.

Most building companies are proud of their massive and rising profits. But while profits may be increasing, output in the building sector is 11.3% below its pre-crisis peak.

Last year only 109,370 new homes were built in England, when 240,000 new homes a year are needed in order to meet demand. The consequence of this shortage of homes is sky high rents and house prices.

Renting used to be seen as a temporary stage before getting on the property ladder, but with house prices rising twice as fast as wages, the chance of becoming a homeowner is now little more than a dream for most people.

Currently rents take up an average of 50% of disposable income, a trend that is only likely to worsen.

Moreover, the number of housing benefit claimants who work has risen by 104% since 2009, which says a lot about intensifying exploitation and casualisation in the workforce.

Housing benefit

£24 billion pounds of taxpayer's money a year goes on housing benefit - most of which is going in the pockets of private landlords. Providing council housing with genuinely affordable rents would reduce the bill.

It is also well established that money spent on house building stimulates economic growth faster than any other industry - every £1 spent on housing generates £2.41 in the wider economy, and every new home creates 2.3 jobs.

There are factors other than alleged red tape that can block house building.

'Land-banking'

While the working class suffer, profits roll in for the rich, with land prices having grown by a factor of 16 between 1983 and 2007.

This has led to the super-rich engaging in a practice known as 'landbanking', creating a situation where homes are not built despite the existence of planning permission.

Such land is then sat on until such a time as it can be built on even more profitably.

A report for the Greater London Assembly in 2012 revealed that 45% of homes for which planning permission had been granted would not be built because the companies that secured them are not in the building business!

Few believe the Tories lies, but the week before David Cameron's arrival at Downing Street in 2010, speaking on the topic of social housing he boasted: "The Conservative position... is very clear: we support social housing, we will protect it, and we respect social tenants' rights."

This 'support' obviously doesn't stretch as far as to actually provide social housing, as growing waiting lists illustrate - some 4.5 million people and counting.

The government's affordable housing budget for 2011-2015 has been almost halved. The social rented housing model has now been dropped in favour of an 'affordable rent' tenure.

New homes built will be let at up to 80% of local market rents with 'flexible' tenancies of a minimum of two years instead of secure lifetime tenancies.

This is just the latest in a long line of attacks. The Tories' 1996 Housing Act replaced a homeless person's legal right to permanent accommodation with temporary housing for up to two years.

Stock transfer

This vicious attack was then followed by New Labour's demunicipalisation of social housing through 'stock transfer' to housing associations and by acting to expand the role of private providers and finance in this sector.

The 2011 Localism Act brought about by the Con-Dems has given teeth to the Tories' 'big society' vision of privatisation and charity-based welfare.

The housing crisis has again been framed in such a way that blame has been shifted towards so-called 'scroungers' putting a drain on society.

House building should exist to provide shelter for all, but under capitalism, as with any other industry, the main aim becomes to make money for those at the top. Why would big business worry about providing roofs over people's heads if there is no profit to be made?

Our demands on housing include:

* Tackle the housing crisis by mass building and renovation of council houses

*Cap all rents in the private sector at council rent level

*Scrap the bedroom tax

*For a £10 an hour minimum wage for all

*Nationalise the house-building companies

*Fight for a socialist alternative to capitalism

For more information, or to join the Socialist Party, visit: www.socialistparty.o
rg.uk
Why is there a housing crisis? The Daily Telegraph predicted that 2014 will be another profitable year for homeowners, suggesting that "the spring could be a great time to go for that investment-****-count ry-house you have had your eye on." What a luxury for a privileged few, to be able to snap up another property, sit back and watch the value soar! A stark contrast to the situation that most of us are facing. Homelessness in England has increased by a third since 2010, and home ownership is now at its lowest level in 25 years. Most building companies are proud of their massive and rising profits. But while profits may be increasing, output in the building sector is 11.3% below its pre-crisis peak. Last year only 109,370 new homes were built in England, when 240,000 new homes a year are needed in order to meet demand. The consequence of this shortage of homes is sky high rents and house prices. Renting used to be seen as a temporary stage before getting on the property ladder, but with house prices rising twice as fast as wages, the chance of becoming a homeowner is now little more than a dream for most people. Currently rents take up an average of 50% of disposable income, a trend that is only likely to worsen. Moreover, the number of housing benefit claimants who work has risen by 104% since 2009, which says a lot about intensifying exploitation and casualisation in the workforce. Housing benefit £24 billion pounds of taxpayer's money a year goes on housing benefit - most of which is going in the pockets of private landlords. Providing council housing with genuinely affordable rents would reduce the bill. It is also well established that money spent on house building stimulates economic growth faster than any other industry - every £1 spent on housing generates £2.41 in the wider economy, and every new home creates 2.3 jobs. There are factors other than alleged red tape that can block house building. 'Land-banking' While the working class suffer, profits roll in for the rich, with land prices having grown by a factor of 16 between 1983 and 2007. This has led to the super-rich engaging in a practice known as 'landbanking', creating a situation where homes are not built despite the existence of planning permission. Such land is then sat on until such a time as it can be built on even more profitably. A report for the Greater London Assembly in 2012 revealed that 45% of homes for which planning permission had been granted would not be built because the companies that secured them are not in the building business! Few believe the Tories lies, but the week before David Cameron's arrival at Downing Street in 2010, speaking on the topic of social housing he boasted: "The Conservative position... is very clear: we support social housing, we will protect it, and we respect social tenants' rights." This 'support' obviously doesn't stretch as far as to actually provide social housing, as growing waiting lists illustrate - some 4.5 million people and counting. The government's affordable housing budget for 2011-2015 has been almost halved. The social rented housing model has now been dropped in favour of an 'affordable rent' tenure. New homes built will be let at up to 80% of local market rents with 'flexible' tenancies of a minimum of two years instead of secure lifetime tenancies. This is just the latest in a long line of attacks. The Tories' 1996 Housing Act replaced a homeless person's legal right to permanent accommodation with temporary housing for up to two years. Stock transfer This vicious attack was then followed by New Labour's demunicipalisation of social housing through 'stock transfer' to housing associations and by acting to expand the role of private providers and finance in this sector. The 2011 Localism Act brought about by the Con-Dems has given teeth to the Tories' 'big society' vision of privatisation and charity-based welfare. The housing crisis has again been framed in such a way that blame has been shifted towards so-called 'scroungers' putting a drain on society. House building should exist to provide shelter for all, but under capitalism, as with any other industry, the main aim becomes to make money for those at the top. Why would big business worry about providing roofs over people's heads if there is no profit to be made? Our demands on housing include: * Tackle the housing crisis by mass building and renovation of council houses *Cap all rents in the private sector at council rent level *Scrap the bedroom tax *For a £10 an hour minimum wage for all *Nationalise the house-building companies *Fight for a socialist alternative to capitalism For more information, or to join the Socialist Party, visit: www.socialistparty.o rg.uk SocialistParty-SomersetBranch
  • Score: -3

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree